The End of "Change"

The End of “Change”

It is a harsh reality of language that the same word can label different principles. Before the November 8, 2016 election “change” labeled the principles of shadowy backroom organizers who supposed that ethnicity, gender, and class division would forever fuel political success.

After the November 8, 2016 election “change” is viewed glaringly as an incompetent set of principles that did not, and cannot, succeed. On November 8, 2016 American voters—clear-sighted and intrinsically motivated—brought “change” to an end. Their actions can and should be measured at every level of government.

President Trump won 306 of the 538 available electoral colleges votes. This total includes wins in seven of the largest ten states as measured by population (footnote 1). President Trump also won Wyoming, the smallest state as measured by population. Of the remaining thirty-nine states, President Trump won twenty-two.

The United States House of Representatives and The United States Senate are both controlled by a majority of Republicans.

Republicans occupy 33 out of 50 state governorships; the highest level since 1992. Republicans control both the governorship and state legislature of 25 states. These states account for 255 electoral college votes. President Trump won 251 of these votes (footnote 2). It takes 270 electoral college votes to win the presidency.

Democrats control the governorship and the state legislature of five states. Hillary Clinton won all five of these states which total 73 electoral college votes (footnote 3). Again, it takes 270 electoral college votes to win the presidency.

These statistics are the result of a common culture reinstating principles that have proved successful over time. Here are some of those principles…

Income is earned, not distributed. A system that focusses on the former leads to inequality; a system that focusses on the latter leads to starvation. People who must spend their own money for a good or service will take both costs and benefits into account. All education is private in that it occurs in the mind of a student as guided by a teacher. The solution to inner-city despair is opportunity, not subsidy. Regulations that do not create Pareto improvements must be eliminated. Reducing the national debt is more important than intensifying entitlements. Natural resources must be exploited, which means used. Laws are made by elected representatives. Judges and justices who seize powers they do not have must be replaced. A country’s borders must be secure. Immigrants must follow the rule of law. America’s friends should be helped. America’s enemies should be hurt. The United Nations does not unite nations, nor can it. Security is important, but freedom is more important. Deterrence means frightening away, which requires a military capable of frightening.

Our situation is clear: as we cannot live without government, we must avoid those who seek to exploit it. Either we avail ourselves of principles that have proved successful over time, or we confine ourselves with the cynical, grimy, identity politics of “change.” Why would anyone ever again vote for the latter?

The End of “Change”
Written by Matt Manna
Mar 1, 2017 • 8E01E497(R01)
Photo © pabloprat – Fotolia.com

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On Words: Part 1

On Words: Part 1

On June 12, 2016 a radical Islamic terrorist shot 102 people inside the Pulse nightclub located in Orlando Florida. On June 12, 2016 a home-grown terrorist shot 102 people inside the Pulse nightclub located in Orland Florida. Which of the previous two sentences do you believe best describes what happened on June 12, 2016 inside the Pulse nightclub located in Orlando Florida?

As you mull over your answer, consider what you must do in order to answer. You must identify that the only difference between the two sentences are the words “radical Islamic terrorist” and “home-grown terrorist.” You must determine the difference(s) in meaning between “radical Islamic terrorist” and “home-grown terrorist.” And you must determine which best describes what happened on June 12, 2016 inside of the Pulse nightclub.

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Severe Restriction

Severe Restriction

Imagine a bomb exploded in your hometown today. It was in a messenger bag that belonged to a person sitting in a popular restaurant in the heart of “restaurant row.” The bomber reached into the bag and detonated the device shortly after 12:00 noon, lunch time – the busiest time of day. Many people, including the bomber, died. Many others were wounded. Some seriously.

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Thanksgiving

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Life in America is neither dulling or dull. Life in America is brilliant; made so mindfully and continuously by the very day-to-day experience the fourth Thursday in November misrepresents.

Daily life is the result of a process started 3.75 billion years ago when energy from a small yellow dwarf star joined forces with pre-biotic chemicals located on one of eight nearby orbiting planets. The crowing achievement of this process (so far) is the human brain, a unique biological structure, in which, somewhere, is found the human mind.

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